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Workplace Accessibility Assessments

Your premises should offer a welcome to everyone - staff and customers alike.

Service Users & Customers

Disabled people sometimes find that their welcome is restricted by barriers both in and outside the building and by the attitudes of some people.

In making an assessment of your facilities it is necessary to look at the ways in which people arrive at and enter the premises, the internal design and circulation, ways of getting to different levels, toilets and emergency exits,

Our assessors are profoundly Deaf and therefore uniquely positioned to accurately determine the barriers to other D/deaf people and make practical and realistic suggestions to improve access in a detailed report – which will often include some very simple, low cost adjustments.

D/deaf Staff

Are any of your employees D/deaf or Hard-of-Hearing?

We can offer practical advice on what equipment, support and reasonable adjustments can be made to support your staff, and ensure you as an employer are taking steps towards fulfilling your obligations under the Equality Act 2010

Making an Assessment

The usual method of assessing a premise is to undertake a virtual journey into the building to assess the barriers to D/deaf & Hard-of-Hearing staff

How Do We Carry Out a Work Based Assessment?

Assessments are normally carried out in the employee’s main place of work and usually last between one to two hours. Ideally the assessment should take place away from the employee’s work station, in a quiet area.

If your employee is a British Sign Language user then our assessors will be able to communicate directly with them; if not we will provide a BSL Interpreter.

Once our access consultant has gathered all the information needed it may be necessary to discreetly look around the work station and surrounding areas.

After the visit, the assessor will research the most appropriate and cost effective equipment compatible with people who are D/deaf or have a hearing loss.

These recommendations are then highlighted in a detailed report – which will often include some very simple, low cost adjustments.

How Much Does it Cost to Make a Reasonable Adjustment?

Physical adjustments might include new computer hardware or software, ergonomic furniture or specialist office equipment and the Government's ‘Access to Work’ scheme can also help with more expensive solutions – www.gov.uk